Moving Your Plants

Moving houseplants on a moving van is usually not a good idea. The extremes in temperature and lack of fresh air and moisture can be fatal. It will be up to your driver or moving company to decide whether to move your plants. In most cases, movers will not assume liability for plants.

Consider the options of either giving your plants to friends, hospitals and libraries, or selling them. If you decide to transport your house plants long-distance, here are some precautions to ensure they arrive in good condition:

  • Re-pot plants in clay pots into unbreakable, plastic containers.
  • Prune larger plants.
  • Eliminate insects or plant parasites.
  • Give your plants their normal dose of water. In winter, roots saturated with moisture may freeze. In summer, too much water can result in fungus growth.
  • Pack your plants the night before or the morning of your move. Conventional packing cartons are good for moving plants. Cushion branches and leaves with soft paper. Punch air holes in the sides of the box. This way, your plants should be able to travel safely for up to four days.

Factors affecting the move of your plants:

Shock

Some houseplants are susceptible to shock when moving. More time in transit or storage won't make the shock greater, but it means your plant will take longer to recover.

Temperature

Temperatures below 5°C or above 30°C for over an hour can be fatal. Plants in properly wrapped cartons will withstand a wider range of temperatures. Most moving trucks and even storage and transfer areas do not have controlled temperatures.

Water

Plants should be moist when transporting. Most can survive a week to 10 days without being watered and suffer little harm.

Darkness

When other conditions are favourable, houseplants can tolerate darkness for up to a week. However, too much time in the dark causes plants to put out abnormal growth and become more susceptible to disease. Limit sun exposure for the first few days after the move.

Rules and regulations regarding plants

Moving plants from province to province can be done without any special inspections. If you're transporting houseplants across borders, check federal, provincial, and state regulations, and make sure there are no plant quarantines in effect.

courtesy of: http://www.royallepage.ca/en/realestateguide/moving/planning/moving-your-plants.aspx

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